Children's Stories
   The Gingerbread Man
   Jack and the Beanstalk
   Brer Rabbit's Christmas
   Beauty and the Beast
   The Little Red Hen
   The Little Mermaid
   Henny Penny
   The Three Little Pigs
   Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp
   Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
   The Great Big Turnip
   Sleeping Beauty
   Goldilocks and the Three Bears
   Rapunzel
   Alice in Wonderland
   Pinocchio
   Peter Pan
   Jack the Giant Killer
   The Ugly Duckling
   Puss in Boots
   Rumpelstiltskin
   The Frog Prince
   Dick Whittington and His Cat
   Hansel and Gretel
   Fancy Nancy and the Bathroom Plant
   The Wee, Wee Mannie
   Never Kick a Slipper at The Moon
   How the Tortoise Became
   Akim and the Mermaid
   The Boy with the Long Name
   The Tiger-Eating Jackals Cubs
   Sam Pig's Trousers
   When the Cock Crows
   The Butterfly Garden
   Mrs. Pepperpot Finds a Hidden Treasure
   The Princess And The Pea
   Johnny-Cake
   Why the Agouti Has No Tail
   I Love Little Pussy
   Mary-Mary And The Snow Giant
   Danny Fox Steals Some Fish
   The Old Woman And Her Pig
   The Little Woman's Water Pot
   Hector Protector
   Bagpipes
   How the Ashes Shovel Helped Snoo Foo
   My Naughty Little Sister and Father Christmas
  Bible Story For Toddler
   Old Testament Stories
   New Testament Stories
 Children's Bible Stories
   Old Testament Stories
   New Testament Stories
 Bible Story Coloring Pages
   Old Testament Coloring
   New Testament Coloring

 

 

Bible Stories Contact Us Bible Story Coloring Pages Children's Stories

Home » Children's Stories » The Wee, Wee Mannie

 

 

The Wee, Wee Mannie

A Scottish folktale

Retold by Joseph Jacobs

 

Once upon a time, when all big folks were wee ones and all lies were true, there was a wee, wee Mannie that had a big Coo. And out he went to milk her of a morning, and said Hold still, my Coo, my hinny, Hold still, my hinny, my Coo, And ye shall have for your dinner What but a milk white doo.

But the big, big Coo wouldn't hold still.

"Hout!" said the wee, wee Mannie Hold still, my Coo, my dearie, And fill my bucket wi' milk, And if yell be no contrairy I'll gi'e ye a gown o' silk.

But the big, big Coo wouldn't hold still.

"Look at that, now!" said the wee,

wee Mannie What's a wee, wee mannie to do,

Wi' such a big contrairy Coo?

So off he went to his mother at the house. "Mother," said he, "Coo won't stand still, and wee, wee Mannie can't milk big, big Coo."

"Hout!" says his mother, "take stick and beat Coo."

So off he went to get a stick from the tree, and said —

Break, stick, break,

And I'll gi'e ye a cake.

But the stick wouldn't break, so back he went to the house. "Mother," says he, "Coo

won't hold still, stick won't break, wee, wee Mannie can't beat big, big Coo."

"Hout!" says his mother, "go to the Butcher and bid him kill Coo."

So off he went to the Butcher, and said Butcher, kill the big, big Coo, She'll gi'e us no more milk noo.

But the Butcher wouldn't kill the

Coo without a silver penny, so back the Mannie went to the house. 'Mother," says he, "Coo won't hold still, stick won't break, Butcher won't kill without a silver penny, and wee, wee Mannie can't milk, big, big Coo."

"Well," said his mother, "go to the Coo and tell her there's a weary, weary lady with long yellow hair weeping for a cup o' milk."

So off he went and told the Coo, but she wouldn't hold still, so back he went and told his mother.

"Well," said she, "tell the Coo there's a fine, fine laddie from the wars sitting by the weary, weary lady with golden hair, and she weeping for a sup o' milk."

So off he went and told the Coo, but she wouldn't hold still, so back he went and told his mother.

"Well," said his mother, "tell the big, big Coo there's a sharp, sharp sword at the belt of the fine, fine laddie from the wars who sits beside the weary, weary lady with the golden hair, and she weeping for a sup o' milk."

And he told the big, big Coo, but she wouldn't hold still.

Then said his mother, "Run quick and tell her that her head's going to be cut off by the sharp, sharp sword in the hands of the fine, fine laddie, if she doesn't give the sup o' milk the weary, weary lady weeps for."

And wee, wee Mannie went off and told the big, big Coo.

And when Coo saw the glint of the sharp, sharp word in the hand of the fine, fine laddie come from he wars, put by his sharp, sharp sword, and all and the weary, weary lady weeping for a sup o' milk, she reckoned she'd better hold still. So wee, wee Mannie milked big, big Coo, and the weary, weary lady with the golden hair hushed her weeping and got her sup o' milk, and the fine, fine laddie new come from the wars put by his sharp, sharp sword, and all went well that didn't go ill.

 

Google
 

 

 Copyright © Young Learner Publications New Delhi. All rights reserved. No part of this production may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means - electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise withot prior written permission.